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There are currently 6 questions tagged . Is this tag useful?

The first requirement for a tag to be useful is for the community to agree on its meaning. I think I see what means: it's used on questions about solving puzzles, as opposed to designing puzzles and other activities. may be a better name for that. Is my intuited meaning consensual? If not, what should it mean?

The second consideration is whether the tag is useful. scores 1/2 on the meta tag checklist: it's reasonably objective (assuming the meaning above), but it doesn't really stand alone on a question. Another test for tags is the usage triptych:

  • Might someone subscribe to it? I guess so, if you're interested in solving puzzles but not setting them.
  • Might someone ignore it? I guess so, if you're interested in designing puzzles but not in solving them.
  • Is it useful in searches? Maybe a little.

A tag is only useful if it's consistently applied, however, and I can see this being problematic. We have a lot more than 6 questions about solving puzzles, most of them do not have the tag. And there's a lot of overlap between designing and solving activities — a lot of questions are about analyzing a puzzle and relevant to both solving and setting.

So should we have this tag? If so, what are its usage rules?

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I'm solidly on the fence. On the one hand, it's a quick, easy way to tell if someone wants a solution. On the other hand, what sort of questions are not solutions?

Yes, could be helpful, but I don't see how on earth it could be applied consistently (as you mentioned), unless, like meta, questions had a required tag (I'd suggest adding , , and to ). But then we run into another issue you mentioned: What about a question that fits more than one of those tags?

I'm not sure there is a solution, certainly not an easy one.

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    $\begingroup$ I agree: it's too general of a tag to have constructive use $\endgroup$ – user20 May 21 '14 at 22:43

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