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Emrakul made an invisible edit to my latest puzzle in order to remove it from the Hot Network Questions. I was not consulted about this beforehand or afterwards.

  • Question for Emrakul: why was my question removed from the HNQs?
  • Question for the community: is this appropriate behaviour? If one user posts a question, is another user (even a moderator) entitled to remove it from the HNQs? It's a perfectly valid question with a serious answer.

The fact that my question includes a picture of ... ahem ... a certain body part cannot be sufficient reason to remove it from the HNQs, since this question was extremely high on the HNQs for a long time (note the ridiculously high number of views and upvotes).

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    $\begingroup$ Why the downvotes? Surely there's no harm in asking for an explanation. $\endgroup$ – xnor Mar 11 '15 at 0:21
  • $\begingroup$ I've accepted Emrakul's answer because it answers my specific questions (the answer to the second one being no AFAICU), but Jon Ericson's answer is more generally useful for the future. $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Mar 11 '15 at 13:34
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The reason I'd originally done this was because surprise nude butts aren't fun when bosses, colleagues, or people in your class (as happened to me) can see exactly what's on your computer.

In retrospect, I probably shouldn't have handled it this way, but I had about twenty seconds to think of a solution before a lecture started. This is somewhat exploitative of how HNQ is designed, but please don't do this in the future. I probably shouldn't have myself.

The fact that it was high on HNQ, however, has no bearing on this, because there's an explicit formula that goes into HNQ that doesn't factor in things like whether someone will unexpectedly encounter pictures of nude butts.

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    $\begingroup$ Thanks for explaining! When you say "please don't do this", does that mean please don't edit in the way you did? $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Mar 10 '15 at 23:02
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    $\begingroup$ PS. Think of all the drive-by upvotes I could have got if that question had stayed on the HNQs! You owe me some rep now. Bounty? ;-) $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Mar 10 '15 at 23:09
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    $\begingroup$ @randal'thor You got some rep from me anyway, since this question is in the hot meta questions list! This should be factored into any bounties. :-) $\endgroup$ – David Richerby Mar 22 '15 at 20:32
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I propose a simpler solution: hide the image behind a link. That way unsuspecting users from this site or others will not be confronted with unwanted nudity. The problem isn't the Hot Questions list; it's surprise awaiting anyone who follows a link to the question.

See also: Does the spoiler markdown work on images?

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    $\begingroup$ Yes, I just saw your edit. This seems to resolve the problem @Emrakul raised (in fact it solves it better than Emrakul's way, since now even users browsing Puzzling won't happen across the image) without interfering with anything else such as the HNQ system. $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Mar 10 '15 at 23:34
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    $\begingroup$ I don't know why this didn't occur to me originally. This is a much better solution. $\endgroup$ – Aza Mar 10 '15 at 23:44
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Just use a spoiler tag, and explain outside the spoiler tag that it's not safe for work. That way the puzzle still makes sense, but no-one is "surprised" by it at work.

rebus

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    $\begingroup$ But people can still mouse over accidentally and the picture will flash up on their screen. I think Jon Ericson's solution is better. $\endgroup$ – Rand al'Thor Mar 16 '15 at 16:03

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