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By now you've probably seen questions like this:

My first through fourth are a test. My third through seventh are enough. What am I?

with the answer being

EXAMPLE, since letters 1 through 4 are EXAM and letters 3 through 7 are AMPLE.

The idea is that each clue describes a substring of the solution, and placing the clue answers together in the specified way gives an answer word or phrase.

Now, I noticed that we have several of these types of puzzle:

(and those aren't all!)

I think it's enough to make a tag for this genre. It's certainly common, usually decent quality, and fairly well-liked. But as far as I know, there's no "official" name for them - at least, not one widely used.

So, my question to you is: What should we call these?

I can think of several options: , , , and are the first that come to mind. I'd like to get input from the community, though. Do you have a succinct yet descriptive way to reference these puzzles?

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  • $\begingroup$ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logogriph $\endgroup$ – Ian MacDonald Aug 18 '16 at 20:05
  • $\begingroup$ @Ian: I can find no modern usage of that term or any examples online that aren't just definitions for it. The entire first two pages of Google results for "logogriph" are definitions, which leads me to suspect that it is not in common use. $\endgroup$ – Deusovi Aug 19 '16 at 0:53
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    $\begingroup$ The funny thing about words is that once you start using them, they will be in use. ;) $\endgroup$ – Ian MacDonald Aug 19 '16 at 3:35
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. I think that that's the most logical - you have to assemble the word.

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Will Shortz wrote some articles for Word Ways, about the history of word puzzles. Pertinent here is "British Word Puzzles (1800-1850)", Word Ways Vol. 6 (1973), Issue 4, p.214. If you put this key string into your search engine: british word puzzles 1800-1850 william f shortz then that should bring up some links to online copies of it. On that article's 3rd page, Shortz describes the logogriph, which was exactly the sort of puzzle we're discussing here.

The only other versified puzzle that was in vogue during the early 1800s was the logogriph. In this puzzle, the keyword was enigmatically expressed, and then clues were given to other words which were composed of letters contained in the keyword. Thus, one logogriph appeared in The Masquerade on the word "spear", which contains the letters which form ape, spar, reap, asp, ear, rap, par, pear, pare, are, as, sap, rasp, sea, pea, spa and spare. Logogriphs tended to be inordinately long, as clues had to be given to each word contained in the keyword.

But, really, who'd use to seek them here?

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    $\begingroup$ I'm not sure why this is downvoted. Logogriph is basically what these puzzles are: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logogriph $\endgroup$ – Ian MacDonald Aug 18 '16 at 20:02
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    $\begingroup$ This seems to be the correct technical term. That probably supercedes the other options; for the sake of convenience we could synonymize colloquialisms in, but the tag should be the correct term. $\endgroup$ – Aza Aug 18 '16 at 20:08
  • $\begingroup$ If this is the technically correct term then we should use it. $\endgroup$ – A E Aug 21 '16 at 17:17
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Yeah, seem to be more puzzles like this nowadays.

I like the word-extraction or assembly.

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I'm voting for or !

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Hmm, would be approbriate ? link

But then again, if nobody knows what it means, nobody would use it... ;c)

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How about ? Admittedly in word puzzles that are called charades, the elements that are put together are longer than individual letters. Still, people seeking word-puzzles are likely to know the word "charade". If there were a different term specifically for the letter-unit charade, for one thing it might be so obscure nobody would use it, and for another thing it might be splitting hairs to introduce two tags for these two varieties of word-puzzle.

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  • $\begingroup$ The issue with that is that charades usually imply distinct words - for instance, EX + AMP + LE. I don't think overlaps happen in word puzzle charades. $\endgroup$ – Deusovi Aug 11 '16 at 17:56

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