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Recently I've visited a question "is there a name for this?" which has been put on hold as off topic because of

This question does not appear to be about creation and solving of puzzles, within the scope defined in the help center.

But when someone have a question on puzzle rather than a puzzling question, what else they could do?

Should we refer/ move such question to some other site like history of science and mathematics site? or the English site? or the math site? If the question is not about a serious science or mathematic chapter, but relevant in puzzling, or if not about mainstream English grammar and literature, then is it very wrong to ask in this (puzzling) site?

A question may come... "why instead actively solving a puzzle, you are asking a question about puzzle? why that is beneficial or practically important"? More specifically, in the cited question, which seeks only the name of a certain type of puzzle?

One importance I've seen, this-type of questions sometimes arise while explaining a particular situation in some-other unrelated subject (for say, biochemistry); an analogy with a type of puzzle or game or art-method etc. do a huge help in visualization. But sometimes it becomes impossible to cite that in a text just because forgetting / not finding the name, whereas in some-other corner of the world, the name exists yet remain unused in a book in in the corner of a library.

And beside just a puzzle's name, there could be other significance, like "why in chess we follow the king's side and queen's side rule?" or "is it possible to construct Rubik's cube with unequal number of boxes in X, Y and Z direction?" includes some critical knowledge.

So, should we allow questions as on-topic, which are not themselves puzzles, but requires intervention of puzzle-experts?

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    $\begingroup$ Note that your chess question in the second-last paragraph is not puzzle-related either, although the Rubik's cube question might be considered on-topic. $\endgroup$ – GentlePurpleRain Feb 1 '17 at 19:28
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Yes, and we already do - just look under , , and . In fact, that was the original purpose of the site.

That question was closed because it is not a puzzle or related to puzzles.

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